Particle Psychology, Incendiary, Pound Arts Gallery, 2020
Medium: terracotta, steel mesh, charred wood, lighting gel, greaseproof paper, ash
Particle Psychology explores ceremonial responses to burnt waste and particle filtration, taking the long view of our history of exposure to carbon and other particulates in the air. Using a vocabulary combining ancient and synthetic materials, Hughes references neolithic exposure to carbon particles from hearth fires and drying kilns, to the less tangible but more toxic waste produced by incineration and the burning of carbon fuels today.
Particle Psychology, Incendiary, Pound Arts Gallery, 2020
Medium: terracotta, steel mesh, charred wood, lighting gel, greaseproof paper, ash
Particle Psychology explores ceremonial responses to burnt waste and particle filtration, taking the long view of our history of exposure to carbon and other particulates in the air. Using a vocabulary combining ancient and synthetic materials, Hughes references neolithic exposure to carbon particles from hearth fires and drying kilns, to the less tangible but more toxic waste produced by incineration and the burning of carbon fuels today.
Particle Psychology, Incendiary, Pound Arts Gallery, 2020
Medium: terracotta, steel mesh, charred wood, lighting gel, greaseproof paper, ash
Particle Psychology explores ceremonial responses to burnt waste and particle filtration, taking the long view of our history of exposure to carbon and other particulates in the air. Using a vocabulary combining ancient and synthetic materials, Hughes references neolithic exposure to carbon particles from hearth fires and drying kilns, to the less tangible but more toxic waste produced by incineration and the burning of carbon fuels today.
Particle Psychology, Incendiary, Pound Arts Gallery, 2020
Medium: terracotta, steel mesh, charred wood, lighting gel, greaseproof paper, ash
Particle Psychology explores ceremonial responses to burnt waste and particle filtration, taking the long view of our history of exposure to carbon and other particulates in the air. Using a vocabulary combining ancient and synthetic materials, Hughes references neolithic exposure to carbon particles from hearth fires and drying kilns, to the less tangible but more toxic waste produced by incineration and the burning of carbon fuels today.
Particle Psychology, Incendiary, Pound Arts Gallery, 2020
Medium: terracotta, steel mesh, charred wood, lighting gel, greaseproof paper, ash
Particle Psychology explores ceremonial responses to burnt waste and particle filtration, taking the long view of our history of exposure to carbon and other particulates in the air. Using a vocabulary combining ancient and synthetic materials, Hughes references neolithic exposure to carbon particles from hearth fires and drying kilns, to the less tangible but more toxic waste produced by incineration and the burning of carbon fuels today.
Particle Psychology, Incendiary, Pound Arts Gallery, 2020
Medium: terracotta, steel mesh, charred wood, lighting gel, greaseproof paper, ash
Particle Psychology explores ceremonial responses to burnt waste and particle filtration, taking the long view of our history of exposure to carbon and other particulates in the air. Using a vocabulary combining ancient and synthetic materials, Hughes references neolithic exposure to carbon particles from hearth fires and drying kilns, to the less tangible but more toxic waste produced by incineration and the burning of carbon fuels today.
Particle Psychology, Incendiary, Pound Arts Gallery, 2020
Medium: terracotta, steel mesh, charred wood, lighting gel, greaseproof paper, ash
Particle Psychology explores ceremonial responses to burnt waste and particle filtration, taking the long view of our history of exposure to carbon and other particulates in the air. Using a vocabulary combining ancient and synthetic materials, Hughes references neolithic exposure to carbon particles from hearth fires and drying kilns, to the less tangible but more toxic waste produced by incineration and the burning of carbon fuels today.
Reactive Red, Material Flow, Museum in the Park, 2019
Reactive Red, shot in a disused quarry, is a response to a painting in Stroud museum showing red cloth from the textile indistry hanging up to dry in the fields. Hughes explores the possible connotations of 'red in the landscape' and the idea that red is a colour of limits. The cloth has been dyed using dyes derived from petroleum and iron, oils and metal. In this landscape it could signify the limits of material extraction.
Honey Coloured Light, digital photograph, 2019
Remnant, Material Flow, Museum in the Park, 2019
Made of plant-dyed cloth, straw, wool and teasels, Remnant is a spectral ‘revenant’ of the woollen industry, a rolling tumbleweed roaming the landscape since the heyday of textile production.
The Ragpicker, Stroud Valley Artspace, 2019
Hughes’ work for the exhibition 'Indendiary' reimagines the 'Ragpicker', a figure associated with 19th century western cities who collected rags and bones so they could be transformed in to paper and glue. The Ragpickers of Paris sorted the city’s detritus by hand, sifting through the ‘motley vomit of enormous Paris’, as Baudelaire described it. Today’s ragpickers, mostly in the developing world, sort through toxic materials including the innards of computers. The props presented here explore how the identity of the ragpicker could be reinvented in the west.
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The Ragpicker, Stroud Valley Artspace, 2019
Hughes’ work for the exhibition 'Indendiary' reimagines the 'Ragpicker', a figure associated with 19th century western cities who collected rags and bones so they could be transformed in to paper and glue. The Ragpickers of Paris sorted the city’s detritus by hand, sifting through the ‘motley vomit of enormous Paris’, as Baudelaire described it. Today’s ragpickers, mostly in the developing world, sort through toxic materials including the innards of computers. The props presented here explore how the identity of the ragpicker could be reinvented in the west.
The Ragpicker, Stroud Valley Artspace, 2019
Hughes’ work for the exhibition 'Indendiary' reimagines the 'Ragpicker', a figure associated with 19th century western cities who collected rags and bones so they could be transformed in to paper and glue. The Ragpickers of Paris sorted the city’s detritus by hand, sifting through the ‘motley vomit of enormous Paris’, as Baudelaire described it. Today’s ragpickers, mostly in the developing world, sort through toxic materials including the innards of computers. The props presented here explore how the identity of the ragpicker could be reinvented in the west.
The Ragpicker, Stroud Valley Artspace, 2019
Hughes’ work for the exhibition 'Indendiary' reimagines the 'Ragpicker', a figure associated with 19th century western cities who collected rags and bones so they could be transformed in to paper and glue. The Ragpickers of Paris sorted the city’s detritus by hand, sifting through the ‘motley vomit of enormous Paris’, as Baudelaire described it. Today’s ragpickers, mostly in the developing world, sort through toxic materials including the innards of computers. The props presented here explore how the identity of the ragpicker could be reinvented in the west.
Expanse, digital collage
Dome, digital photograph, 2016
'Dome' is an architectural reconstruction and an homage to the millenium dome made of earth, egg yolk and pins.
Uphold The Banks, Oriel Davies Gallery, 2017
Uphold The Banks, (detail)
'Uphold the Banks' is a mixed-media installation including cast-iron pieces based on original canal engineering patterns. The sculptures reference the materials, such as wool and boiled sugar, which were used to cure the joints in aqueduct construction
Uphold The Banks (detail)
Uphold The Banks (detail)
Uphold The Banks (detail)
Aromatic Monitor, Glasgow International
The ‘Silent Monitor’ is one of Robert Owen’s inventions and was used as a replacement for physical punishment in his textile mill, and to monitor workers behaviour. It was a wooden tapered cuboid shape with coloured sides, each representing a moral state ranging from super-excellence to excessive naughtiness. The 'Aromatic Monitor' is inspired by this original dystopian/progressive device but uses smells carried on dyed fleece to propagate information about conflicting moral states in the same space.
Aromatic Monitor
Aromatic Monitor
Geological Etiquette, The Late Shows, Newcastle
A series of hanging sculptures were created in response to the history of the Mining Institute in Newcastle. The sculptures are based on the suspended crystal lamps that were the first electric lighting in the building in the 19th century, and had long since been removed. The original motif bore some of the attributes of a pineapple but was crowned by leaves that looked oak-like. The re-imagined objects are jet-black orbs absorbing rather than emitting light. They parasitically inhabit the form of the original design, whilst refusing to reenact its purpose.
Geological Etiquette
Geological Etiquette
Geological Etiquette
Geological Etiquette
Afters, A. Vermin Projects, Glasgow
Afters
Afters
In Order of Appearance, Project Room Gallery, Glasgow
In Order of Appearance
In Order of Appearance