Ffont Pumlumon, Severn Worlding, SVA John St. Gallery, Stroud, 2022
Medium: steel, wool, water, LED bulb
Ffont Pumlumon is a mythic-industrial font, adrift from it’s origin at the source of the river Severn in the Pumlumon mountain-range in Mid Wales. The peat-infused waters of the Severn’s source are obscure but rich, held in a sphagnum embrace. Here they are encapsulated in iron and encircled in wool, as they perform a temporal drift into the Severn’s siltier territories in Gloucestershire (image: Nettie Atkisson).
Ffont Pumlumon, Severn Worlding, SVA John St. Gallery, Stroud, 2022
Medium: steel, wool, water, LED bulb
Ffont Pumlumon is a mythic-industrial font, adrift from it’s origin at the source of the river Severn in the Pumlumon mountain-range in Mid Wales. The peat-infused waters of the Severn’s source are obscure but rich, held in a sphagnum embrace. Here they are encapsulated in iron and encircled in wool, as they perform a temporal drift into the Severn’s siltier territories in Gloucestershire (image: Nettie Atkisson).
Ffont Pumlumon, Severn Worlding, SVA John St. Gallery, Stroud, 2022
Medium: steel, wool, water, LED bulb
Ffont Pumlumon is a mythic-industrial font, adrift from it’s origin at the source of the river Severn in the Pumlumon mountain-range in Mid Wales. The peat-infused waters of the Severn’s source are obscure but rich, held in a sphagnum embrace. Here they are encapsulated in iron and encircled in wool, as they perform a temporal drift into the Severn’s siltier territories in Gloucestershire (image: Nettie Atkisson).
Ffont Pumlumon, Severn Worlding, SVA John St. Gallery, Stroud, 2022
Medium: steel, wool, water, LED bulb
Ffont Pumlumon is a mythic-industrial font, adrift from it’s origin at the source of the river Severn in the Pumlumon mountain-range in Mid Wales. The peat-infused waters of the Severn’s source are obscure but rich, held in a sphagnum embrace. Here they are encapsulated in iron and encircled in wool, as they perform a temporal drift into the Severn’s siltier territories in Gloucestershire (image: Nettie Atkisson).
Municipal Primeval, The Hide Installation & Sculpture Showcase, Nailsworth, 2022
Medium: seeds, earth, fired and unfired ceramic, brass, canvas, carob pods, mealworms
Installation piece Municipal Primeval occupied the vegetable patch, embedding ceramic vessels and constructions in the soil. The pieces are coated in bumps and pores through which water and roots can pass, and are infiltrated by shoots and leaves. Some are strangely anthropomorphic stacked vessels, like canopic jars for botanical ‘organs’. Mair Hughes and Brenda Waite tend to the beds as two ‘alchemical botanists’, tinkering with processes usually associated with gold.
Municipal Primeval, The Hide Installation & Sculpture Showcase, Nailsworth, 2022
Medium: seeds, earth, fired and unfired ceramic, brass, canvas, carob pods, mealworms
Installation piece Municipal Primeval occupied the vegetable patch, embedding ceramic vessels and constructions in the soil. The pieces are coated in bumps and pores through which water and roots can pass, and are infiltrated by shoots and leaves. Some are strangely anthropomorphic stacked vessels, like canopic jars for botanical ‘organs’. Mair Hughes and Brenda Waite tend to the beds as two ‘alchemical botanists’, tinkering with processes usually associated with gold.
Municipal Primeval, The Hide Installation & Sculpture Showcase, Nailsworth, 2022
Medium: seeds, earth, fired and unfired ceramic, brass, canvas, carob pods, mealworms
Installation piece Municipal Primeval occupied the vegetable patch, embedding ceramic vessels and constructions in the soil. The pieces are coated in bumps and pores through which water and roots can pass, and are infiltrated by shoots and leaves. Some are strangely anthropomorphic stacked vessels, like canopic jars for botanical ‘organs’. Mair Hughes and Brenda Waite tend to the beds as two ‘alchemical botanists’, tinkering with processes usually associated with gold.
Municipal Primeval, The Hide Installation & Sculpture Showcase, Nailsworth, 2022
Medium: seeds, earth, fired and unfired ceramic, brass, canvas, carob pods, mealworms
Installation piece Municipal Primeval occupied the vegetable patch, embedding ceramic vessels and constructions in the soil. The pieces are coated in bumps and pores through which water and roots can pass, and are infiltrated by shoots and leaves. Some are strangely anthropomorphic stacked vessels, like canopic jars for botanical ‘organs’. Mair Hughes and Brenda Waite tend to the beds as two ‘alchemical botanists’, tinkering with processes usually associated with gold.
Municipal Primeval, The Hide Installation & Sculpture Showcase, Nailsworth, 2022
Medium: seeds, earth, fired and unfired ceramic, brass, canvas, carob pods, mealworms
Installation piece Municipal Primeval occupied the vegetable patch, embedding ceramic vessels and constructions in the soil. The pieces are coated in bumps and pores through which water and roots can pass, and are infiltrated by shoots and leaves. Some are strangely anthropomorphic stacked vessels, like canopic jars for botanical ‘organs’. Mair Hughes and Brenda Waite tend to the beds as two ‘alchemical botanists’, tinkering with processes usually associated with gold.
Municipal Primeval, The Hide Installation & Sculpture Showcase, Nailsworth, 2022
Medium: seeds, earth, fired and unfired ceramic, brass, canvas, carob pods, mealworms
Installation piece Municipal Primeval occupied the vegetable patch, embedding ceramic vessels and constructions in the soil. The pieces are coated in bumps and pores through which water and roots can pass, and are infiltrated by shoots and leaves. Some are strangely anthropomorphic stacked vessels, like canopic jars for botanical ‘organs’. Mair Hughes and Brenda Waite tend to the beds as two ‘alchemical botanists’, tinkering with processes usually associated with gold.
Municipal Primeval, The Hide Installation & Sculpture Showcase, Nailsworth, 2022
Medium: seeds, earth, fired and unfired ceramic, brass, canvas, carob pods, mealworms
Installation piece Municipal Primeval occupied the vegetable patch, embedding ceramic vessels and constructions in the soil. The pieces are coated in bumps and pores through which water and roots can pass, and are infiltrated by shoots and leaves. Some are strangely anthropomorphic stacked vessels, like canopic jars for botanical ‘organs’. Mair Hughes and Brenda Waite tend to the beds as two ‘alchemical botanists’, tinkering with processes usually associated with gold.
Municipal Primeval, The Hide Installation & Sculpture Showcase, Nailsworth, 2022
Medium: seeds, earth, fired and unfired ceramic, brass, canvas, carob pods, mealworms
Installation piece Municipal Primeval occupied the vegetable patch, embedding ceramic vessels and constructions in the soil. The pieces are coated in bumps and pores through which water and roots can pass, and are infiltrated by shoots and leaves. Some are strangely anthropomorphic stacked vessels, like canopic jars for botanical ‘organs’. Mair Hughes and Brenda Waite tend to the beds as two ‘alchemical botanists’, tinkering with processes usually associated with gold.
Municipal Primeval, The Hide Installation & Sculpture Showcase, Nailsworth, 2022
Medium: seeds, earth, fired and unfired ceramic, brass, canvas, carob pods, mealworms
Installation piece Municipal Primeval occupied the vegetable patch, embedding ceramic vessels and constructions in the soil. The pieces are coated in bumps and pores through which water and roots can pass, and are infiltrated by shoots and leaves. Some are strangely anthropomorphic stacked vessels, like canopic jars for botanical ‘organs’. Mair Hughes and Brenda Waite tend to the beds as two ‘alchemical botanists’, tinkering with processes usually associated with gold.
Municipal Primeval, The Hide Installation & Sculpture Showcase, Nailsworth, 2022
Medium: seeds, earth, fired and unfired ceramic, brass, canvas, carob pods, mealworms
Installation piece Municipal Primeval occupied the vegetable patch, embedding ceramic vessels and constructions in the soil. The pieces are coated in bumps and pores through which water and roots can pass, and are infiltrated by shoots and leaves. Some are strangely anthropomorphic stacked vessels, like canopic jars for botanical ‘organs’. Mair Hughes and Brenda Waite tend to the beds as two ‘alchemical botanists’, tinkering with processes usually associated with gold.
Propagation, Artist Residency, SVA John St. Gallery, Stroud, 2022
Medium: beetroot seeds, strawberry plants, earth, ceramic, ferns, glass jar
Propagation residency at Stroud Valley Artspace. Work in progress experimenting with growing seeds embedded into a sculptural piece.
Propagation, Artist Residency, SVA John St. Gallery, Stroud, 2022
Medium: beetroot seeds, strawberry plants, earth, ceramic, ferns, glass jar
Propagation residency at Stroud Valley Artspace. Work in progress experimenting with growing seeds embedded into a sculptural piece.
Propagation, Artist Residency, SVA John St. Gallery, Stroud, 2022
Medium: beetroot seeds, strawberry plants, earth, ceramic, ferns, glass jar
Propagation residency at Stroud Valley Artspace. Work in progress experimenting with growing seeds embedded into a sculptural piece.
Earthscape Cosmography, Invoking Absence, Hallidays Mill Gallery, 2021
Medium: fired ceramic, leather, oil paint, unfired local clay
Earthscape Cosmography explores human/non-human tools and connections to extraction, mining, ancient quarrying. An assemblage of objects referencing antler tools and ancient relics imprinted with the maker's hand, these are place materials carrying an imaginary value of exchange reaching through human timescales.
Earthscape Cosmography, Invoking Absence, Hallidays Mill Gallery, 2021
Medium: fired ceramic, leather, oil paint, unfired local clay
Earthscape Cosmography explores human/non-human tools and connections to extraction, mining, ancient quarrying. An assemblage of objects referencing antler tools and ancient relics imprinted with the maker's hand, these are place materials carrying an imaginary value of exchange reaching through human timescales.
Particle Psychology, Incendiary, Pound Arts Gallery, 2020
Medium: terracotta, steel mesh, charred wood, lighting gel, greaseproof paper, ash
Particle Psychology explores ceremonial responses to burnt waste and particle filtration, taking the long view of our history of exposure to carbon and other particulates in the air. Using a vocabulary combining ancient and synthetic materials, Hughes references neolithic exposure to carbon particles from hearth fires and drying kilns, to the less tangible but more toxic waste produced by incineration and the burning of carbon fuels today.
Particle Psychology, Incendiary, Pound Arts Gallery, 2020
Medium: terracotta, steel mesh, charred wood, lighting gel, greaseproof paper, ash
Particle Psychology explores ceremonial responses to burnt waste and particle filtration, taking the long view of our history of exposure to carbon and other particulates in the air. Using a vocabulary combining ancient and synthetic materials, Hughes references neolithic exposure to carbon particles from hearth fires and drying kilns, to the less tangible but more toxic waste produced by incineration and the burning of carbon fuels today.
Particle Psychology, Incendiary, Pound Arts Gallery, 2020
Medium: terracotta, steel mesh, charred wood, lighting gel, greaseproof paper, ash
Particle Psychology explores ceremonial responses to burnt waste and particle filtration, taking the long view of our history of exposure to carbon and other particulates in the air. Using a vocabulary combining ancient and synthetic materials, Hughes references neolithic exposure to carbon particles from hearth fires and drying kilns, to the less tangible but more toxic waste produced by incineration and the burning of carbon fuels today.
Particle Psychology, Incendiary, Pound Arts Gallery, 2020
Medium: terracotta, steel mesh, charred wood, lighting gel, greaseproof paper, ash
Particle Psychology explores ceremonial responses to burnt waste and particle filtration, taking the long view of our history of exposure to carbon and other particulates in the air. Using a vocabulary combining ancient and synthetic materials, Hughes references neolithic exposure to carbon particles from hearth fires and drying kilns, to the less tangible but more toxic waste produced by incineration and the burning of carbon fuels today.
Reactive Red, Material Flow, Museum in the Park, 2019
Reactive Red, shot in a disused quarry, is a response to a painting in Stroud museum showing red cloth from the textile indistry hanging up to dry in the fields. Hughes explores the possible connotations of 'red in the landscape' and the idea that red is a colour of limits. The cloth has been dyed using dyes derived from petroleum and iron, oils and metal. In this landscape it could signify the limits of material extraction.
Honey Coloured Light, digital photograph, 2019
Remnant, Material Flow, Museum in the Park, 2019
Made of plant-dyed cloth, straw, wool and teasels, Remnant is a spectral ‘revenant’ of the woollen industry, a rolling tumbleweed roaming the landscape since the heyday of textile production.
The Ragpicker, Stroud Valley Artspace, 2019
Hughes’ work for the exhibition 'Indendiary' reimagines the 'Ragpicker', a figure associated with 19th century western cities who collected rags and bones so they could be transformed in to paper and glue. The Ragpickers of Paris sorted the city’s detritus by hand, sifting through the ‘motley vomit of enormous Paris’, as Baudelaire described it. Today’s ragpickers, mostly in the developing world, sort through toxic materials including the innards of computers. The props presented here explore how the identity of the ragpicker could be reinvented in the west.
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The Ragpicker, Stroud Valley Artspace, 2019
Hughes’ work for the exhibition 'Indendiary' reimagines the 'Ragpicker', a figure associated with 19th century western cities who collected rags and bones so they could be transformed in to paper and glue. The Ragpickers of Paris sorted the city’s detritus by hand, sifting through the ‘motley vomit of enormous Paris’, as Baudelaire described it. Today’s ragpickers, mostly in the developing world, sort through toxic materials including the innards of computers. The props presented here explore how the identity of the ragpicker could be reinvented in the west.
The Ragpicker, Stroud Valley Artspace, 2019
Hughes’ work for the exhibition 'Indendiary' reimagines the 'Ragpicker', a figure associated with 19th century western cities who collected rags and bones so they could be transformed in to paper and glue. The Ragpickers of Paris sorted the city’s detritus by hand, sifting through the ‘motley vomit of enormous Paris’, as Baudelaire described it. Today’s ragpickers, mostly in the developing world, sort through toxic materials including the innards of computers. The props presented here explore how the identity of the ragpicker could be reinvented in the west.
The Ragpicker, Stroud Valley Artspace, 2019
Hughes’ work for the exhibition 'Indendiary' reimagines the 'Ragpicker', a figure associated with 19th century western cities who collected rags and bones so they could be transformed in to paper and glue. The Ragpickers of Paris sorted the city’s detritus by hand, sifting through the ‘motley vomit of enormous Paris’, as Baudelaire described it. Today’s ragpickers, mostly in the developing world, sort through toxic materials including the innards of computers. The props presented here explore how the identity of the ragpicker could be reinvented in the west.